Genetic Counselors Programming

New this year! Don’t miss more than 30 sessions catering to the interest of genetic counselors working in cardiovascular electrophysiology. Learn more about our educational opportunities and NSGC accreditation.

This event will submitted to the National Society of Genetic Counselors (NGCS) for approval of Category 1 CEUs.

 

Wednesday, May 10 

C-SP04. Inside Pandora's Box: Implications of ACMG Secondary Findings for Cardiology Clinical Practice

Session Description: In 2013 the American College of Medical Genetics (ACMG) released recommendations for the reporting of secondary findings in clinical exome and genome sequencing (WES/WGS), which advised reporting of pathogenic or likely pathogenic variants in 20 genes associated with inherited arrhythmia and cardiomyopathy conditions. This session will review the ACMG recommendations for reporting secondary findings and discuss the impact of these recommendations on cardiology clinical practice. Using case examples, this session will specifically address the broad implications of these findings for the patient, family and health care system as well as the critical role of the multidisciplinary team.

 

Thursday, May 11

C-SP19. Escaping (or Accepting) Genetic Purgatory

Session Description: As cardiovascular genetic testing panels grow in gene quantity and clinical exome/genome sequencing begins to be offered to patients with inherited heart diseases, providers will receive an increasing number of variants of uncertain significance. This session will discuss the impact of a patient's phenotype and family history on the likelihood of finding and understanding a variant of uncertain significance (VUS), how a clinician may facilitate the reclassification of a VUS to pathogenic or benign, and what to do when genetic test results remain equivocal. The session will conclude with national efforts to help solve the challenge of gene variant interpretation.

 

Friday, May 12

C-SP25. Cardiac Arrests in Patients with Acute Heart Failure: Is it really Myocarditis?

Session Description: Individuals who present with cardiac arrests and acute heart failure are often assumed to have myocarditis; however, that is not always the case. Correctly identifying the etiology of the cardiac arrests in these cases has important implications for not only the patient, but also for family members. Learn strategies to differentiate between myocarditis and other causes of cardiac arrests in patients with acute heart failure, including genetic cardiomyopathies.

 

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